• Mending Fences: New Works by Carol MacDonald

    Mending Fences: New Works by Carol MacDonald

    Mending Fences is a multifaceted exhibition of objects, monotypes, & site-specific installations that — in the face of complex cultural challenges — promotes both simple & profound acts of repair. The exhibition will include environmental and gallery installations of works inspired by Rokeby Museum artifacts & archives.

  • Free & Safe: The Underground Railroad in Vermont

    This stunning exhibit chronicles the stories of Simon and Jesse, two fugitives from slavery who found shelter at Rokeby in the 1830s. Free & Safe traces their stories from slavery to freedom, introduces the abolitionist Robinsons who called Rokeby home, and explores the turbulent decades leading up to the Civil War.

  • The Robinson House

    Historic Robinson Home

    The house tour is an intimate experience, during which visitors encounter the stories of all four generations of the Robinsons on their own terms — and in their own spaces. Each tour group is limited to twelve guests, and is shepherded by an expert guide who is ready and able to answer questions. House tours last about 45–60 minutes and are offered Friday–Monday at 11:00 and 2:00.

  • Support Rokeby's Mission

    Support Our Mission

    Help Rokeby connect visitors with the human experience of the Underground Railroad & with the lives of the four generations of Robinsons who lived here from 1793–1961. Guided by Rachel Gilpin & Rowland Thomas Robinson’s commitment to speaking truth to power, today’s Rokeby is committed to serving as a center for exploration and discussion of contemporary social justice issues.


Rokeby Museum presents a nationally significant Underground Railroad story tucked inside a quintessential Vermont experience.
A major exhibit — Free & Safe: The Underground Railroad in Vermont — brings the Underground Railroad vividly to life. Focused on Simon and Jesse, two fugitives from slavery who found shelter here in the 1830s, the exhibit traces their stories from slavery to freedom, introduces the abolitionist Robinson family who called Rokeby home, and explores the turbulent decades leading up to the Civil War. The historic house — fully furnished with 200 years of domestic belongings — provides an intimate glimpse into the family’s life through four generations. Once a thriving Merino sheep farm, Rokeby retains nine historic farm buildings filled with agricultural artifacts. Acres of pastoral landscape dotted with old wells, stone walls, and historic orchards invite a leisurely stroll or a hike up the trail. Picnic tables accommodate lunch outdoors.